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26.01.15

Director and CEO of Burnet Institute, Professor Brendan Crabb has been awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in the Australia Day Honours for his contributions to medical research and global health. »

04.12.14

Professor Alan Cowman has won the Sornchai Looareesuwan Medal 2014 for his significant contributions to understanding how the malaria parasite causes disease and for his search for potential malaria vaccines. »

02.12.14

Scientists have released details of a raft of new chemicals with potent anti-malarial properties which could open the way to new drugs to fight the disease. A new paper in PNAS is the third published recently by a group at the Australian National University (ANU). The group has collaborated with scientists from around the globe to uncover potential ammunition in the fight against malaria. »

20.11.14

Platelet scientist Dr Emma Josefsson and malaria researcher Dr Justin Boddey are the joint recipients of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute’s top research award, the 2014 Burnet Prize. »

29.09.14

Five genes that have a role in either protecting or making people more susceptible to severe malaria have been identified in a new international study led by Dr Sarah Dunstan of The Nossal Institute of Global Health, University of Melbourne and published in Nature Genetics. »

09.09.14

A new study by ANU researchers has revealed a weak spot in the complex life cycle of malaria, which could be exploited to prevent the spread of the deadly disease. It found female malaria parasites put on fat differently to male ones. “The study opens potential new ways to combat malaria,” said Associate Professor Alexander Maier, from the Research School of Biology. »

03.09.14

New discovery could help turn antibiotic into antimalarial drug. The work of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers Dr Wilson Wong, Dr Jake Baum and colleagues in showing how emetine attaches to and blocks the molecular machinery that makes the proteins required for malaria parasite survival has revealed new approaches for antimalarial drug development. Their study, involving collaborators led by Dr Sjors Scheres from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK and the Bio21 Institute in Melbourne was published in the journal eLife. »

02.07.14

Dr Justin Boddey, Dr Brad Sleebs and colleagues at WEHI have developed a compound that blocks the action of a key ‘gatekeeper’ enzyme essential for malaria parasite survival. »

07.11.13

Congratulations to Professor Alan Cowman, who has won the Mahathir Science Award in Tropical Research from the Academy of Sciences Malaysia. »

08.10.13

Malaria researcher Professor Alan Cowman from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has been awarded the 2013 Victoria Prize for Science and Innovation in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the quest to eradicate malaria. »

02.07.13

A vaccine which could spell the end of the scourge of malaria may finally be within reach. Researchers at Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics have been able to induce malaria immunity in animals and are now poised to advance first-stage human trials. »

30.04.13

WEHI researchers are leading the development of a new malaria vaccine that can be tailored to combat the many variants of malaria that exist around the world. Human trials of the vaccine will begin next year. The new vaccine uses a genetically-modified strain of the malaria parasite to protect people who are at risk from malaria infection. It has been developed by a team of researchers led by Dr Krystal Evans, Professor Louis Schofield and Professor Alan Cowman from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute’s Infection and Immunity division, and Professor James McCarthy from the Berghofer QIMR Institute of Medical Research. »

27.09.12

Congratulations to Professor Alan Cowman, head of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute’s Infection and Immunity division who has been named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Senior International Research Scholar, his fourth award from the institute. Alan was the only Australian researcher to receive a grant from HHMI Senior International Research Scholar in 2012.
Professor Alan Cowman has spent the past 30 years studying the parasite Plasmodium falciparum and has had a major impact on infectious disease research in the field of malaria. The research has led to a better understanding of how the malaria parasite evades detection by the human immune system and how it becomes resistant to antimalarial drugs.
»

30.03.12

A new malaria drug regime tested in Papua New Guinea can cut malaria infections in infants by up to 30 per cent. Burnet’s Head of Immunology Professor James Beeson and Professor John Reeder, formally of Burnet, now the Director of the Special Programme on for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases at the World Health Organization collaborated with the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) on the project. The three-year trial showed this new regime was effective against both plasmodium falciparum and plasmodium vivax. This is the first time a drug treatment has shown to prevent infections by both strains of malaria.»

01.12.11

Congratulations to Professor Alan Cowman who was awarded one of the National Health and Medical Research Council's (NHMRC) top honours receiving the 2011 Research Fellowship Achievement Award. The NHMRC Fellowship will support Professor Cowman's research exploring how the Plasmodium parasite identifies, invades and remodels the host cells in which it lives, scavenging nutrients andhiding from the immune system.»

01.12.11

Congratulations to Professor Alan Cowman who was awarded one of the National Health and Medical Research Council's (NHMRC) top honours receiving the 2011 Research Fellowship Achievement Award. The NHMRC Fellowship will support Professor Cowman's research exploring how the Plasmodium parasite identifies, invades and remodels the host cells in which it lives, scavenging nutrients andhiding from the immune system.»

26.06.11

Congratulations to Menzies Research Institute student Clare Smith who attended the 61st Nobel Laureates meeting in medicine/physiology. Clare was funded to attend this meeting by the Australian Academy of Science, the Lindau Council and Merck KGaA »

06.09.11

Congratulations to Prof Alan Cowman, Dr Julie Healer, Mr Sash Lopaticki, Dr Wai-Hong Tham, Ms Jennifer Thompson and Mr Tony Triglia from WEHI - winners of the 2011 Australian Museum's Eureka Prize for Infectious Diseases Research. The Cowman team won the prestigious prize for its extended research into the malaria parasite.»

12.08.11

Congratulations to Dr Alex Maier (La Trobe University) a finalist in the Australian Museum's Eureka Prizes for the second year in a row. Alex is a finalist for the 'People's Choice' science award. »

25.05.11

Congratulations to Dr Jake Baum, from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, and colleagues, Dr Friedrich Frischknech from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and Dr Dave Kovar from the University of Chicago, US, who were awarded US$1.05 million over three years from The Human Frontier Science Program to investigate new methods of preventing malaria infection. »

20.05.11

Congratulations to Prof Alan Cowman (Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) who has been elected to the Royal Society of London. »

05.05.11

Congratulations to Prof Leann Tilley who was awarded the The 2011 Beckman Coulter Discovery Science Award. »

27.10.10

Congratulations to WEHI malaria researchers who have been publishing their work, read more about the research findings from Alan Cowman and James Beeson's groups here. »

12.10.10

Congratulations to Rowena Martin, Australian National University and University of Melbourne, who was awarded a L’Oreal Australia For Women in Science Fellowship on 26 August 2010, the inaugural Macquarie University Eureka Prize for Early Career Research at the 2010 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes for her “Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in the Malaria Parasite” research, and was the recipient of a 2010 ACT Young Tall Poppy Scientist award. Well done Rowena! »

12.10.10

Congratulations to Alex Maier, La Trobe University, who was a finalist for the Australian Museum Eureka Prize 2010 Scientific Research: Research and Innovation for his malaria research "Undoing Malaria's Molecular Velcro". »

12.10.10

Congratulations to Walter & Eliza Hall Institute researchers Chris Tonkin and Justin Boddey who were among nine 2010 Victorian Young Tall Poppy Science Award winners. Chris was named Victorian Young Tall Poppy of the Year, receiving $5000 for his research "Molecular Parasitology/Malaria Biology" and Justin was awarded his prize for his research "Malaria Protein Trafficking & Host Cell Remodelling" »

12.10.10

Alyssa Barry, Burnet Institute, has recently been awarded funding from the Wellcome Trust (UK) to study two of the six known human malaria parasites. »

20.08.10

Congratulations to Lee Yeoh, The University of Melbourne, who was awarded Best Oral Presentation for an Australian Society for Parasitology Student Member at ICOPA XII. Lee's presentation was entitled "Localisations and functions of M16 family zinc metallopeptidases in apicomplexan parasites.

Congratulations to Tegan Dolstra, Australian National University, who was awarded an ASP Student Prize for Best Poster at ICOPA XII. »

18.08.10

Congratulations to Leann Tilley, La Trobe University who was awarded the highly prestigious Bancroft-Mackerras medal from the Australian Society for Parasitology. »

10.08.10

EVIMalaR has recently inducted eight new groups for affiliate memberships. These labs are now eligible for exchanges on the OzEMalaR Travel Award scheme. »

The new EVIMalaR labs are in Cluster 1, Charlotte Behr, CNRS, University of Bordeaux and Peter Bull, KEMRI Centre for Geographic Medicine Research Coast; in Cluster 2, Till Voss, Swiss Tropical & Public Health Institute, David Baker, LSHTM London; in Cluster 3, Flaminia Catteruccia , UniversitÓ degli Studi di Perugia, Lisa Ranford Cartright, University of Glasgow, FBLS; and in Cluster 4, Edwin Lasonder, Nijmegen Medical Centre, Radboud University, Delmiro Fernandez-Reyes, National Institute for Medical Research.

03.06.10

New treatments for malaria are possible after Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists found that molecules similar to the blood-thinning drug heparin can stop malaria from infecting red blood cells. »

Congratulations to Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers Dr James Beeson, Ms Michelle Boyle and Dr Jack Richards from the institute's Infection and Immunity division, along with colleagues at the Burnet Institute and Imperial College London, have identified a new approach that could stop the parasite infecting red blood cells in the first place. Their research has been published in the international journal Blood. For more details see the WEHI website.

25.02.10

Australian parasitology researchers have been awarded funding by the NHMRC to run OzEMalaR, the Australia - Europe Malaria Research Cooperation, commencing in 2010 »

Congratulations to Geoff McFadden (University of Melbourne), Kevin Saliba (ANU) and colleagues who were successful in their project grant application for Australia - Europe Malaria Research Cooperation - OzEMalaR and were awarded $830,000 over 5 years. Malaria is a global problem with no single solution. A large, but sometimes disjointed, research community is addressing the problem, but more collaboration is vital. OzEMalaR will link 34 Australian labs with 47 European, African & Indian malaria researchers. Funding will enable exchange of modern technologies by supporting early career researchers (PhD and postdocs) from Australia to work and be trained in top European labs. European trainees will work and be trained by Australian malariologists using reciprocal EU support.

04.02.10

WEHI researchers have identified a key protein used by the malaria parasite to transform human red blood cells »

Congratulations to Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers who have identified a key protein used by the malaria parasite to transform human red blood cells, ensuring the parasite's survival. Their discovery means researchers have a clear target against which to develop a new class of anti-malarial drugs that destroy the parasite. Dr Justin Boddey, Dr Tony Hodder, Dr Svenja Gunther, Dr Andrew Pearce and Professor Cowman from the institute, in collaboration with Professor Richard Simpson, Dr Heather Patsiouras and Dr Eugene Kapp of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Professor Brendan Crabb and Paul Gilson at the Burnet Institute and Dr Tania de Koning-Ward at Deakin University, have identified a protein called Plasmepsin V as being essential for effector proteins to be exported into the red blood cell. Their research has been published 4 February 2010 in the international journal Nature.

Story sourced from WEHI website

19.01.10

Promising candidates for malaria vaccine revealed »

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have also uncovered a group of proteins that could form the basis of an effective vaccine against malaria. Dr James Beeson, Dr Freya Fowkes and Dr Jack Richards from the institute’s Infection and Immunity division, along with Dr Julie Simpson from the University of Melbourne, have identified proteins produced by malaria parasites during the blood-stage that are effective at promoting immune responses that protect people from malaria illness. Their findings are published in the international journal PLoS Medicine.

04.01.10

Professor Alan Cowman has been awarded the 2010 Howard Taylor Ricketts Award»

Congratulations to malaria researcher Professor Alan Cowman from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia, has been awarded the 2010 Howard Taylor Ricketts Award by the University of Chicago. The award recognises outstanding accomplishment in the field of medical sciences. "It was a very nice surprise and a great honour to join a list that includes such stellar scientists," Alan said. Alan's research has led to better understanding of how the malaria parasite evades the human immune system as well as anti-malarial drugs. It has also revealed much about how the malaria parasite invades and remodels the human red blood cell. Collectively, this knowledge is being used to identify vaccine and drug candidates against malaria. For more details see the WEHI website.

25.09.09

Science publication for Australian National University researchers »

Congratulations to Rowena Martin and Kiaran Kirk, Australian National University, who published their paper "Chloroquine Transport via the Malaria Parasite's Chloroquine Resistance Transporter" Rowena E. Martin, Rosa V. Marchetti, Anna I. Cowan, Susan M. Howitt, Stefan Bröer, Kiaran Kirk, 25 September 2009, Vol 325, Science. An interview with Rowena by Wendy Zukerman appeared in The Australian, Higher Education October 7, 2009

18.08.09

Michael Good wins 2009 CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science »

Professor Michael Good, Director of the Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR) has been awarded the 2009 CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science.

18.06.09

Nature publication for Burnet Institute researchers »

Tania de Koning-Ward, Brendan Crabb and their research teams at Burnet have published their newly discovered protein export machine in malaria parasites in the prestigious international journal, Nature.

 

 

 

 

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